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Dabchick

The Dabchick Wildlife Reserve (DWR) is situated in the Waterberg region of the Limpopo province. The reserve is roughly two-and-a-half hours’ drive from O. R. Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg.

DWR is over 1 000 hectares in size, which allows us to be involved in various conservation projects, as well as cater for visitors who want to experience the African wilderness and all its inhabitants, big and small. We offer the choice of luxury accommodation or a more rustic experience, according to your tastes.

Activities

Dabchick Wildlife Reserve offers different activities and accommodation, according to your needs – experience the bush in the comfort a luxury tented camp, or attend specially designed courses in a rustic tented bush camp.

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Happy 98th birthday to Sir David Attenborough! His lifelong dedication to sharing the wonders of the natural world has inspired countless individuals to appreciate and protect our planet's biodiversity.

Here's to many more years of his invaluable contributions to conservation and educDavid Attenborough Clubrough Club David Attenborough
youtu.be/cpMmGg-3WlA?si=v93joU4Dabchick Wildlife ReservefAMES FoundationFoundation

For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #Africa
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𝘿𝙖𝙗𝙘𝙝𝙞𝙘𝙠: 𝙒𝙞𝙣𝙩𝙚𝙧 𝙎𝙖𝙛𝙖𝙧𝙞!
Dabchick Wildlife Reserve
𝙀𝙓𝙋𝙀𝙍𝙄𝙀𝙉𝘾𝙀 𝘼 𝙐𝙉𝙄𝙌𝙐𝙀 𝘾𝙊𝙍𝙉𝙀𝙍 𝙊𝙁 𝙏𝙃𝙀 𝙒𝘼𝙏𝙀𝙍𝘽𝙀𝙍𝙂 𝘽𝙐𝙎𝙃 𝙄𝙉 𝘾𝙊𝙈𝙁𝙊𝙍𝙏!

Embark on a winter safari at Dabchick Wildlife Reserve for close encounters with buffalo, sable, giraffe and diverse birdlife - see our Wild Bird of the Month posts! 🦅

📷 Unforgettable photo opportunities await!

💡Escape city life with our solar-powered, Wi-Fi connected camp boasting mountain views and all-day game viewing.

💡Experience the thrill of game drives and guided mountain walks.

💡Our luxury tented camp, accommodating 12, offers a unique, unfenced encounter with nature. Themed tents provide modern amenities in a non-smoking environment.

💡 Explore our initiatives dedicated to conserving endangered and rare species, delving into impactful projects that contribute to wildlife preservation.

For more information, visit:
www.dabchick.co.za/accommodation-at-dabchick-wildlife-reserve/

For reservations, contact Anele by email: hospitality@dabchick.co.za
@followers AMES Foundation
For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #Africa
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𝘿𝙖𝙗𝙘𝙝𝙞𝙘𝙠: 𝙒𝙞𝙣𝙩𝙚𝙧 𝙎𝙖𝙛𝙖𝙧𝙞!
Dabchick Wildlife Reserve
𝙀𝙓𝙋𝙀𝙍𝙄𝙀𝙉𝘾𝙀 𝘼 𝙐𝙉𝙄𝙌𝙐𝙀 𝘾𝙊𝙍𝙉𝙀𝙍 𝙊𝙁 𝙏𝙃𝙀 𝙒𝘼𝙏𝙀𝙍𝘽𝙀𝙍𝙂 𝘽𝙐𝙎𝙃 𝙄𝙉 𝘾𝙊𝙈𝙁𝙊𝙍𝙏!

Embark on a winter safari at Dabchick Wildlife Reserve for close encounters with buffalo, sable, giraffe and diverse birdlife - see our Wild Bird of the Month posts! 🦅

📷 Unforgettable photo opportunities await!

💡Escape city life with our solar-powered, Wi-Fi connected camp boasting mountain views and all-day game viewing. 

💡Experience the thrill of game drives and guided mountain walks. 

💡Our luxury tented camp, accommodating 12, offers a unique, unfenced encounter with nature. Themed tents provide modern amenities in a non-smoking environment.

💡 Explore our initiatives dedicated to conserving endangered and rare species, delving into impactful projects that contribute to wildlife preservation.

For more information, visit:
https://www.dabchick.co.za/accommodation-at-dabchick-wildlife-reserve/

For reservations, contact Anele by email: hospitality@dabchick.co.za
@followers AMES Foundation
For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #AfricaImage attachmentImage attachment

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Looking for this job

Jane Goodall 90th Birthday! Congratulations! ... See MoreSee Less

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@followers join us in celebrating a most remarkable conservationist! Happy 90th Birthday, Dr. Jane Goodall 👏👏👏

Would love to have met her, wonderful person.

🌍 On World Rewilding Day, March 20, 2024, we extend our heartfelt salute to all conservation leaders around the globe. Your dedication and passion are turning hopes into actions, paving the way for a brighter, more sustainable future for our planet. Let's continue to work together, embodying the spirit of #HopeIntoAction, to restore and protect our precious wildlife and ecosystems. Together, we can make a difference! #WorldRewildingDay

@followersDabchick Wildlife Reserveserve reservations, contact Anele by email: hospitality@dabchick.co.za

For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #Africa
... See MoreSee Less

🌍 On World Rewilding Day, March 20, 2024, we extend our heartfelt salute to all conservation leaders around the globe. Your dedication and passion are turning hopes into actions, paving the way for a brighter, more sustainable future for our planet. Lets continue to work together, embodying the spirit of #HopeIntoAction, to restore and protect our precious wildlife and ecosystems. Together, we can make a difference! #WorldRewildingDay

@followers
For Dabchick Wildlife Reserve reservations, contact Anele by email: hospitality@dabchick.co.za

For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #AfricaImage attachmentImage attachment+1Image attachment

Taking a quick Sunday nap 🦒😴

#AMES #AmesFoundation #SouthAfrica #Giraffes #Nature
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⚠️𝙒𝙊𝙍𝙇𝘿’𝙎 𝙈𝙊𝙎𝙏 𝙏𝙍𝘼𝙁𝙁𝙄𝘾𝙆𝙀𝘿 𝘼𝙉𝙄𝙈𝘼𝙇
𝐉𝐨𝐢𝐧 𝐮𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐨𝐛𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐖𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝 𝐏𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐨𝐥𝐢𝐧 𝐃𝐚𝐲 𝟐𝟎𝟐𝟒

💡𝘗𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘰𝘭𝘪𝘯 – 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘷𝘦𝘯𝘦𝘳𝘢𝘣𝘭𝘦 ‘𝘸𝘪𝘴𝘦 𝘰𝘭𝘥 𝘮𝘢𝘯’ 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘈𝘧𝘳𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘯 𝘣𝘶𝘴𝘩 – 𝘪𝘴 𝘴𝘢𝘪𝘥 𝘵𝘰 𝘣𝘦 𝘢 𝘵𝘰𝘵𝘦𝘮 𝘰𝘧 𝘨𝘰𝘰𝘥 𝘭𝘶𝘤𝘬 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘣𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘦𝘳 𝘰𝘧 𝘳𝘢𝘪𝘯. 𝘛𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘦𝘯𝘪𝘨𝘮𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘤 𝘤𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵𝘶𝘳𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘩𝘰𝘭𝘥𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘴𝘦𝘤𝘳𝘦𝘵𝘴 𝘰𝘧 85 𝘮𝘪𝘭𝘭𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘺𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘦𝘷𝘰𝘭𝘶𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘪𝘴 𝘯𝘰𝘸 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘮𝘰𝘴𝘵 𝘱𝘰𝘢𝘤𝘩𝘦𝘥 𝘮𝘢𝘮𝘮𝘢𝘭 𝘰𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘱𝘭𝘢𝘯𝘦𝘵…

These scaly anteaters are listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN’s Red List – largely because they are being poached relentlessly (along with the other three African pangolin species) for illegal trade. Their scales are used as traditional medicine in both Africa and Asia. This trade appears to focus largely on the selling of live pangolins.
IUCN Red List of Threatened Species
Throughout Africa, pangolins are largely targeted as bushmeat, with scales used in traditional medicine. The species is considered powerful and held in high regard, but just a small quantity of each scale is used.

⚠️Unfortunately, Asian demand for scales means they are now a commodity and poaching has increased hugely. Asian trade has boomed because the Asian pangolins have all but been wiped out – two species are listed as Critically Endangered.

The African Pangolin Working Group (APWG) was established on 27 June 2011, following an inaugural meeting by a diverse group of people who all have one passion in common – understanding and protecting pangolins in Africa.

The APWG’s objectives are encompassed by its mission statement: “The African Pangolin Working Group will strive towards the conservation and protection of all four African pangolin species by generating knowledge, developing partnerships and creating public awareness and education initiatives.”

𝐆𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐯𝐨𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐝!
The APWG is mapping the past and present distribution of all pangolin occurring on the African continent. APWG requests members of the public to please submit all their pangolin sightings (past, present and future) to this survey.

They welcome sightings of any pangolin species from any year and any country. All sighting locations are treated with the strictest confidence.

To participate, visit:
africanpangolin.org/conserve/report-a-pangolin-sighting/

For more information on the APWG, visit: www.africanpangolin.org

Follow APWG on Facebook! www.facebook.com/pages/African-Pangolin-Working-Group/513407302073363

Photos as published in 𝙋𝙖𝙣𝙜𝙤𝙡𝙞𝙣𝙨: 𝙎𝙘𝙖𝙡𝙚𝙨 𝙤𝙛 𝙄𝙣𝙟𝙪𝙨𝙩𝙞𝙘𝙚 by Richard Peirce (2020). Available online! www.penguinrandomhouse.co.za/book/pangolins-scales-injustice/9781775847137
Struik Nature Club

For more information about Dabchick Wildlife Reserve, visit www.dabchick.co.za
AMES Foundation
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #Africa
... See MoreSee Less

⚠️𝙒𝙊𝙍𝙇𝘿’𝙎 𝙈𝙊𝙎𝙏 𝙏𝙍𝘼𝙁𝙁𝙄𝘾𝙆𝙀𝘿 𝘼𝙉𝙄𝙈𝘼𝙇
𝐉𝐨𝐢𝐧 𝐮𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐨𝐛𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐖𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝 𝐏𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐨𝐥𝐢𝐧 𝐃𝐚𝐲 𝟐𝟎𝟐𝟒

💡𝘗𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘰𝘭𝘪𝘯 – 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘷𝘦𝘯𝘦𝘳𝘢𝘣𝘭𝘦 ‘𝘸𝘪𝘴𝘦 𝘰𝘭𝘥 𝘮𝘢𝘯’ 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘈𝘧𝘳𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘯 𝘣𝘶𝘴𝘩 – 𝘪𝘴 𝘴𝘢𝘪𝘥 𝘵𝘰 𝘣𝘦 𝘢 𝘵𝘰𝘵𝘦𝘮 𝘰𝘧 𝘨𝘰𝘰𝘥 𝘭𝘶𝘤𝘬 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘣𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘦𝘳 𝘰𝘧 𝘳𝘢𝘪𝘯. 𝘛𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘦𝘯𝘪𝘨𝘮𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘤 𝘤𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵𝘶𝘳𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘩𝘰𝘭𝘥𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘴𝘦𝘤𝘳𝘦𝘵𝘴 𝘰𝘧 85 𝘮𝘪𝘭𝘭𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘺𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘦𝘷𝘰𝘭𝘶𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘪𝘴 𝘯𝘰𝘸 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘮𝘰𝘴𝘵 𝘱𝘰𝘢𝘤𝘩𝘦𝘥 𝘮𝘢𝘮𝘮𝘢𝘭 𝘰𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘱𝘭𝘢𝘯𝘦𝘵…

These scaly anteaters are listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN’s Red List – largely because they are being poached relentlessly (along with the other three African pangolin species) for illegal trade. Their scales are used as traditional medicine in both Africa and Asia. This trade appears to focus largely on the selling of live pangolins. 
IUCN Red List of Threatened Species
Throughout Africa, pangolins are largely targeted as bushmeat, with scales used in traditional medicine. The species is considered powerful and held in high regard, but just a small quantity of each scale is used. 

⚠️Unfortunately, Asian demand for scales means they are now a commodity and poaching has increased hugely. Asian trade has boomed because the Asian pangolins have all but been wiped out – two species are listed as Critically Endangered.

The African Pangolin Working Group (APWG) was established on 27 June 2011, following an inaugural meeting by a diverse group of people who all have one passion in common – understanding and protecting pangolins in Africa.

The APWG’s objectives are encompassed by its mission statement: “The African Pangolin Working Group will strive towards the conservation and protection of all four African pangolin species by generating knowledge, developing partnerships and creating public awareness and education initiatives.”

𝐆𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐯𝐨𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐝!
The APWG is mapping the past and present distribution of all pangolin occurring on the African continent. APWG requests members of the public to please submit all their pangolin sightings (past, present and future) to this survey.

They welcome sightings of any pangolin species from any year and any country. All sighting locations are treated with the strictest confidence. 

To participate, visit: 
https://africanpangolin.org/conserve/report-a-pangolin-sighting/

For more information on the APWG, visit: www.africanpangolin.org

Follow APWG on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/pages/African-Pangolin-Working-Group/513407302073363

Photos as published in 𝙋𝙖𝙣𝙜𝙤𝙡𝙞𝙣𝙨: 𝙎𝙘𝙖𝙡𝙚𝙨 𝙤𝙛 𝙄𝙣𝙟𝙪𝙨𝙩𝙞𝙘𝙚 by Richard Peirce (2020). Available online! https://www.penguinrandomhouse.co.za/book/pangolins-scales-injustice/9781775847137
Struik Nature Club

For more information about Dabchick Wildlife Reserve, visit www.dabchick.co.za
AMES Foundation
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #AfricaImage attachmentImage attachment+3Image attachment

2 CommentComment on Facebook

Rewilding Africa REWILDING Southern Africa

𝘿𝘼𝘽𝘾𝙃𝙄𝘾𝙆 𝙒𝙄𝙇𝘿 𝘽𝙄𝙍𝘿𝙎
𝐃𝐖𝐑 𝐁𝐢𝐫𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐡!
𝐅𝐞𝐛𝐫𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝟐𝟎𝟐𝟒
𝐕𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐫 (𝙋𝙡𝙤𝙘𝙚𝙪𝙨 𝙘𝙪𝙘𝙪𝙡𝙡𝙖𝙩𝙪𝙨).
𝐈𝐔𝐂𝐍 𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐒𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐮𝐬: Least Concern

Typically one of the most common weaver species where it occurs, but care should be taken to separate it from rarer species, especially when in nonbreeding plumage.

“The village and lesser masked weavers are most similar in their lifestyles. Both are colonial nesters and will often breed in large colonies with both species present.

💡This almost begs the question as to how it is that two such similar species can co-exist as closely as they do.

Colonies are almost invariably located over water, usually suspended from overhanging branches of trees or sometimes in reedbeds where nests are attached to vertical reed stems, they breed in summer after good rains have fallen.

The villages’ nests are neatly woven with little or no entrance spout while those of the lesser maskeds are rather untidy with loose grass stems sticking out and a short, narrow entrance spout.

To attract a female, males display by calling and hanging upside down on the nest fluttering his wings. Calls are rather harsh phrases of ‘swizzling’ and ‘churring’ notes. A female will inspect a nest and if she does not ‘accept’ the structure, the male will destroy it and start again.

💡Contrary to popular belief, it is not the female that destroys the nest if she does not like it! A female will apparently accept a nest if she decides it is structurally sound, but once she has accepted the nest, she will line it with soft grass inflorescences and leaves. The lesser masked male will usually then also lengthen the spout.

Such large breeding colonies are often targeted by predators that try to gain access to the eggs or nestlings. These include snakes (particularly the boomslang and black mamba), but also avian predators, such as harrier-hawks, fish eagles and crows. Vervet monkeys are also known to exploit such colonies. Members of the colony will communally try to defend it by aggressively ‘mobbing’ intruders.

The diet of each of these species is described as having a large insect component, but also the nectar of aloes and Schotia species, flower parts and seeds. Village weavers’ insectivorous preferences are reportedly for small beetles, while lesser maskeds favour caterpillars.

💡So, it is perhaps the difference in diet that allows these two species to successfully co-exist.”
- Extract from Species ID Birds by Dr Ian Whyte as published in KRUGER MAGAZINE AUTUMN 2024.

‼️See photographs and video recordings of both species in ‘comments’, below.

💡”There is a lot still to learn about the amazing nest weaving abilities of this group of birds. It is also a testament to the amazing benefits of mutations, selection pressures and evolution. We must realize that the environment is dynamic and we must learn not to put our static vision of nature in our conservation thinking" - Dr Peter Oberem

🎬 𝐖𝐚𝐭𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬!
Visit youtu.be/62G9kw9Ziek?si=NHbPPA0JU6OaQOLh to watch the video: “How weaver birds evolved to build huge nests”.

🎼 𝐒𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐬, 𝐒𝐨𝐧𝐠𝐬 & 𝐒𝐧𝐚𝐩𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐭𝐬!
ebird.org/species/vilwea1?siteLanguage=en_GB

📸 Keith Collins

@followers
🦅Dabchick Wildlife Reserve always offers great bird and other photography opportunities! Book your stay now!
#Birdwatching #Ecotourism
For reservations, contact Anele by email: hospitality@dabchick.co.za
AMES Foundation Rewilding Africa
For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #Africa
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𝘿𝘼𝘽𝘾𝙃𝙄𝘾𝙆 𝙒𝙄𝙇𝘿 𝘽𝙄𝙍𝘿𝙎
𝐃𝐖𝐑 𝐁𝐢𝐫𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐡! 
𝐅𝐞𝐛𝐫𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝟐𝟎𝟐𝟒
𝐕𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐫 (𝙋𝙡𝙤𝙘𝙚𝙪𝙨 𝙘𝙪𝙘𝙪𝙡𝙡𝙖𝙩𝙪𝙨).
𝐈𝐔𝐂𝐍 𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐒𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐮𝐬: Least Concern

Typically one of the most common weaver species where it occurs, but care should be taken to separate it from rarer species, especially when in nonbreeding plumage.

“The village and lesser masked weavers are most similar in their lifestyles. Both are colonial nesters and will often breed in large colonies with both species present. 

💡This almost begs the question as to how it is that two such similar species can co-exist as closely as they do.

Colonies are almost invariably located over water, usually suspended from overhanging branches of trees or sometimes in reedbeds where nests are attached to vertical reed stems, they breed in summer after good rains have fallen.

The villages’ nests are neatly woven with little or no entrance spout while those of the lesser maskeds are rather untidy with loose grass stems sticking out and a short, narrow entrance spout.

To attract a female, males display by calling and hanging upside down on the nest fluttering his wings. Calls are rather harsh phrases of ‘swizzling’ and ‘churring’ notes. A female will inspect a nest and if she does not ‘accept’ the structure, the male will destroy it and start again. 

💡Contrary to popular belief, it is not the female that destroys the nest if she does not like it! A female will apparently accept a nest if she decides it is structurally sound, but once she has accepted the nest, she will line it with soft grass inflorescences and leaves. The lesser masked male will usually then also lengthen the spout. 

Such large breeding colonies are often targeted by predators that try to gain access to the eggs or nestlings. These include snakes (particularly the boomslang and black mamba), but also avian predators, such as harrier-hawks, fish eagles and crows. Vervet monkeys are also known to exploit such colonies. Members of the colony will communally try to defend it by aggressively ‘mobbing’ intruders.

The diet of each of these species is described as having a large insect component, but also the nectar of aloes and Schotia species, flower parts and seeds. Village weavers’ insectivorous preferences are reportedly for small beetles, while lesser maskeds favour caterpillars. 

💡So, it is perhaps the difference in diet that allows these two species to successfully co-exist.”
- Extract from Species ID Birds by Dr Ian Whyte as published in KRUGER  MAGAZINE AUTUMN 2024.

‼️See photographs and video recordings of both species in ‘comments’, below.

💡”There is a lot still to learn about the amazing nest weaving abilities of this group of birds. It is also a testament to the amazing benefits of mutations, selection pressures and evolution. We must realize that the environment is dynamic and we must learn not to put our static vision of nature in our conservation thinking - Dr Peter Oberem

🎬 𝐖𝐚𝐭𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬!
Visit https://youtu.be/62G9kw9Ziek?si=NHbPPA0JU6OaQOLh to watch the video: “How weaver birds evolved to build huge nests”.

🎼 𝐒𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐬, 𝐒𝐨𝐧𝐠𝐬 & 𝐒𝐧𝐚𝐩𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐭𝐬!
https://ebird.org/species/vilwea1?siteLanguage=en_GB

📸 Keith Collins

@followers
🦅Dabchick Wildlife Reserve always offers great bird and other photography opportunities! Book your stay now! 
#Birdwatching #Ecotourism
For reservations, contact Anele by email: hospitality@dabchick.co.za
AMES Foundation Rewilding Africa
For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #Africa

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𝐕𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐫 (𝙋𝙡𝙤𝙘𝙚𝙪𝙨 𝙘𝙪𝙘𝙪𝙡𝙡𝙖𝙩𝙪𝙨) Visit youtu.be/9Pbmqg2ifxs?si=G6KczjaPndEWXn0m for sound recordings of the village weaver. Published by Stories Of The Kruger.

𝐋𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐫 𝐦𝐚𝐬𝐤𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐞𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐫 (𝙋𝙡𝙤𝙘𝙚𝙪𝙨 𝙞𝙣𝙩𝙚𝙧𝙢𝙚𝙙𝙞𝙪𝙨) Visit youtu.be/crhVqCs6fcE?si=avmcLniNAKkR7zkK for sound recordings of the lesser masked weaver. Published by Stories Of The Kruger.

Nice

𝙇𝙚𝙩’𝙨 𝙤𝙗𝙨𝙚𝙧𝙫𝙚 2024 𝙄𝙣𝙩𝙚𝙧𝙣𝙖𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣𝙖𝙡 𝙕𝙚𝙗𝙧𝙖 𝘿𝙖𝙮!
Dabchick Wildlife Reserve
A common question is, “𝙒𝙝𝙮 𝙙𝙤 𝙯𝙚𝙗𝙧𝙖𝙨 𝙝𝙖𝙫𝙚 𝙗𝙡𝙖𝙘𝙠 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙬𝙝𝙞𝙩𝙚 𝙨𝙩𝙧𝙞𝙥𝙚𝙨?”

💡”There is no certainty about this, but such a skin pattern must have evolved for a reason. Like fingerprints in humans, stripe patterns are unique to each zebra and must be of assistance in recognising each other. This uniqueness is a feature that is often used by researchers studying zebras where individual recognition is important, and the inverted triangular pattern on the shoulder is a useful focal area for facilitating recognition.” (Read more! 𝘿𝘼𝙕𝙕𝙇𝙄𝙉𝙂 𝙕𝙀𝘽𝙍𝘼𝙎 by Dr Ian Whyte, as published in Kruger Magazine, Issue 8, Winter 2019.

💡”Striping as seen in zebra is known to be caused by the migration, in the developing embryo, of the melanoblasts or precursor cells of melanocytes. At a certain stage of embryonic development, the melanoblasts migrate from the neural crest of the embryo in the vertical patterns which are responsible for the black stripes. It is speculated that the white striping is due either to the melanoblasts dying off in the areas which give rise to the white stripes and the white belly, or the genes in the cells in white areas being switched off.” (Dr Pamela Oberem)

💡”Even more interesting is the explanation proposed by zoologist Jonathan Bard for the variation in the number of stripes seen in various zebra species (Burchell’s have 26, Cape mountain 43 and Grévy’s 80). Bard proposed that the stripe development happens at different intervals in embryonic development, those with more stripes developing them when the embryo is larger, thus providing greater surface area for stripes to form. These differences in timing are probably due to gene regulatory changes, possibly with an adaptive function.” (Dr Pamela Oberem)

𝐑𝐞𝐚𝐝 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐭!
𝙏𝙃𝙀 𝙀𝙑𝙊 𝘿𝙀𝙑𝙊 𝙊𝙁 𝘾𝙊𝙇𝙊𝙐𝙍, 𝙎𝙋𝙊𝙏𝙎 𝘼𝙉𝘿 𝙎𝙏𝙍𝙄𝙋𝙀𝙎 by Dr Pamela Oberem
REWILDING Southern Africa Rewilding Africa
‘𝐏𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐏𝐫𝐞𝐝𝐚𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐬’ | 𝐀𝐯𝐚𝐢𝐥𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐰!

📷 Photo © Clint Ralph Photography

For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #Africa
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𝙇𝙚𝙩’𝙨 𝙤𝙗𝙨𝙚𝙧𝙫𝙚 2024 𝙄𝙣𝙩𝙚𝙧𝙣𝙖𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣𝙖𝙡 𝙕𝙚𝙗𝙧𝙖 𝘿𝙖𝙮!
Dabchick Wildlife Reserve
A common question is, “𝙒𝙝𝙮 𝙙𝙤 𝙯𝙚𝙗𝙧𝙖𝙨 𝙝𝙖𝙫𝙚 𝙗𝙡𝙖𝙘𝙠 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙬𝙝𝙞𝙩𝙚 𝙨𝙩𝙧𝙞𝙥𝙚𝙨?” 

💡”There is no certainty about this, but such a skin pattern must have evolved for a reason. Like fingerprints in humans, stripe patterns are unique to each zebra and must be of assistance in recognising each other. This uniqueness is a feature that is often used by researchers studying zebras where individual recognition is important, and the inverted triangular pattern on the shoulder is a useful focal area for facilitating recognition.” (Read more! 𝘿𝘼𝙕𝙕𝙇𝙄𝙉𝙂 𝙕𝙀𝘽𝙍𝘼𝙎 by Dr Ian Whyte, as published in Kruger Magazine, Issue 8, Winter 2019.

💡”Striping as seen in zebra is known to be caused by the migration, in the developing embryo, of the melanoblasts or precursor cells of melanocytes. At a certain stage of embryonic development, the melanoblasts migrate from the neural crest of the embryo in the vertical patterns which are responsible for the black stripes. It is speculated that the white striping is due either to the melanoblasts dying off in the areas which give rise to the white stripes and the white belly, or the genes in the cells in white areas being switched off.” (Dr Pamela Oberem)

💡”Even more interesting is the explanation proposed by zoologist Jonathan Bard for the variation in the number of stripes seen in various zebra species (Burchell’s have 26, Cape mountain 43 and Grévy’s 80). Bard proposed that the stripe development happens at different intervals in embryonic development, those with more stripes developing them when the embryo is larger, thus providing greater surface area for stripes to form. These differences in timing are probably due to gene regulatory changes, possibly with an adaptive function.” (Dr Pamela Oberem)

𝐑𝐞𝐚𝐝 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐭!
𝙏𝙃𝙀 𝙀𝙑𝙊 𝘿𝙀𝙑𝙊 𝙊𝙁 𝘾𝙊𝙇𝙊𝙐𝙍, 𝙎𝙋𝙊𝙏𝙎 𝘼𝙉𝘿 𝙎𝙏𝙍𝙄𝙋𝙀𝙎 by Dr Pamela Oberem
REWILDING Southern Africa Rewilding Africa
‘𝐏𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐏𝐫𝐞𝐝𝐚𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐬’ | 𝐀𝐯𝐚𝐢𝐥𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐰!

📷 Photo © Clint Ralph Photography

For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #Africa

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Pragtige foto.Dankie.

𝐋𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐨𝐛𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞 𝐖𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝 𝐄𝐧𝐯𝐢𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐄𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐃𝐚𝐲!
Dabchick Wildlife Reserve
Waterberg Biosphere Reserve
𝘿𝙒𝙍 𝘽𝙐𝙎𝙃 𝘾𝘼𝙈𝙋 𝘾𝙊𝙐𝙍𝙎𝙀𝙎 𝘼𝙉𝘿 𝘼𝘾𝙏𝙄𝙑𝙄𝙏𝙄𝙀𝙎!
An experienced bushmaster and associate of DWR, Les Brett runs a series of courses in our tented bush camp, which is situated under a giant fig tree. The camp is simple, with a great bush atmosphere (firelight and lamplight), but has basic comforts like hot showers and flush toilets. It can accommodate groups of up to 20 guests.

💡The courses available range from anti-poaching, tracking, survival, bush cooking, education, safaris and much more. The bush camp experience is popular with international students and tourist groups.

To learn more about the bush camp experience, visit Les Brett’s Dung Beetle Bush School! www.dung-beetle.co.za/Home/

For reservations, contact Anele by email: hospitality@dabchick.co.za

For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #Africa
... See MoreSee Less

𝐋𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐨𝐛𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞 𝐖𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝 𝐄𝐧𝐯𝐢𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐄𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐃𝐚𝐲!
Dabchick Wildlife Reserve 
Waterberg Biosphere Reserve
𝘿𝙒𝙍 𝘽𝙐𝙎𝙃 𝘾𝘼𝙈𝙋 𝘾𝙊𝙐𝙍𝙎𝙀𝙎 𝘼𝙉𝘿 𝘼𝘾𝙏𝙄𝙑𝙄𝙏𝙄𝙀𝙎!
An experienced bushmaster and associate of DWR, Les Brett runs a series of courses in our tented bush camp, which is situated under a giant fig tree. The camp is simple, with a great bush atmosphere (firelight and lamplight), but has basic comforts like hot showers and flush toilets. It can accommodate groups of up to 20 guests.

💡The courses available range from anti-poaching, tracking, survival, bush cooking, education, safaris and much more. The bush camp experience is popular with international students and tourist groups.

To learn more about the bush camp experience, visit Les Brett’s Dung Beetle Bush School! http://www.dung-beetle.co.za/Home/

For reservations, contact Anele by email: hospitality@dabchick.co.za

For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #AfricaImage attachment

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𝐖𝐚𝐭𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬! @followers 🎞️ youtu.be/N37myUTO8EQ?si=s19TU7BhqVma2n8Q

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