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Dabchick Wildlife Reserve

Dabchick Wildlife Reserve

To conserve wildlife, protect biodiversity and make Africa a safer place for animals and ecosystems.

Jane Goodall 90th Birthday! Congratulations! ... See MoreSee Less

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@followers join us in celebrating a most remarkable conservationist! Happy 90th Birthday, Dr. Jane Goodall ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘

Would love to have met her, wonderful person.

๐ŸŒ On World Rewilding Day, March 20, 2024, we extend our heartfelt salute to all conservation leaders around the globe. Your dedication and passion are turning hopes into actions, paving the way for a brighter, more sustainable future for our planet. Let's continue to work together, embodying the spirit of #HopeIntoAction, to restore and protect our precious wildlife and ecosystems. Together, we can make a difference! #WorldRewildingDay

@followersDabchick Wildlife Reserveserve reservations, contact Anele by email: hospitality@dabchick.co.za

For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #Africa
... See MoreSee Less

๐ŸŒ On World Rewilding Day, March 20, 2024, we extend our heartfelt salute to all conservation leaders around the globe. Your dedication and passion are turning hopes into actions, paving the way for a brighter, more sustainable future for our planet. Lets continue to work together, embodying the spirit of #HopeIntoAction, to restore and protect our precious wildlife and ecosystems. Together, we can make a difference! #WorldRewildingDay

@followers
For Dabchick Wildlife Reserve reservations, contact Anele by email: hospitality@dabchick.co.za

For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #AfricaImage attachmentImage attachment+1Image attachment

Taking a quick Sunday nap ๐Ÿฆ’๐Ÿ˜ด

#AMES #AmesFoundation #SouthAfrica #Giraffes #Nature
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โš ๏ธ๐™’๐™Š๐™๐™‡๐˜ฟโ€™๐™Ž ๐™ˆ๐™Š๐™Ž๐™ ๐™๐™๐˜ผ๐™๐™๐™„๐˜พ๐™†๐™€๐˜ฟ ๐˜ผ๐™‰๐™„๐™ˆ๐˜ผ๐™‡
๐‰๐จ๐ข๐ง ๐ฎ๐ฌ ๐ข๐ง ๐จ๐›๐ฌ๐ž๐ซ๐ฏ๐ข๐ง๐  ๐–๐จ๐ซ๐ฅ๐ ๐๐š๐ง๐ ๐จ๐ฅ๐ข๐ง ๐ƒ๐š๐ฒ ๐Ÿ๐ŸŽ๐Ÿ๐Ÿ’

๐Ÿ’ก๐˜—๐˜ข๐˜ฏ๐˜จ๐˜ฐ๐˜ญ๐˜ช๐˜ฏ โ€“ ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ท๐˜ฆ๐˜ฏ๐˜ฆ๐˜ณ๐˜ข๐˜ฃ๐˜ญ๐˜ฆ โ€˜๐˜ธ๐˜ช๐˜ด๐˜ฆ ๐˜ฐ๐˜ญ๐˜ฅ ๐˜ฎ๐˜ข๐˜ฏโ€™ ๐˜ฐ๐˜ง ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ˆ๐˜ง๐˜ณ๐˜ช๐˜ค๐˜ข๐˜ฏ ๐˜ฃ๐˜ถ๐˜ด๐˜ฉ โ€“ ๐˜ช๐˜ด ๐˜ด๐˜ข๐˜ช๐˜ฅ ๐˜ต๐˜ฐ ๐˜ฃ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ข ๐˜ต๐˜ฐ๐˜ต๐˜ฆ๐˜ฎ ๐˜ฐ๐˜ง ๐˜จ๐˜ฐ๐˜ฐ๐˜ฅ ๐˜ญ๐˜ถ๐˜ค๐˜ฌ ๐˜ข๐˜ฏ๐˜ฅ ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ฃ๐˜ณ๐˜ช๐˜ฏ๐˜จ๐˜ฆ๐˜ณ ๐˜ฐ๐˜ง ๐˜ณ๐˜ข๐˜ช๐˜ฏ. ๐˜›๐˜ฉ๐˜ช๐˜ด ๐˜ฆ๐˜ฏ๐˜ช๐˜จ๐˜ฎ๐˜ข๐˜ต๐˜ช๐˜ค ๐˜ค๐˜ณ๐˜ฆ๐˜ข๐˜ต๐˜ถ๐˜ณ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ข๐˜ต ๐˜ฉ๐˜ฐ๐˜ญ๐˜ฅ๐˜ด ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ด๐˜ฆ๐˜ค๐˜ณ๐˜ฆ๐˜ต๐˜ด ๐˜ฐ๐˜ง 85 ๐˜ฎ๐˜ช๐˜ญ๐˜ญ๐˜ช๐˜ฐ๐˜ฏ ๐˜บ๐˜ฆ๐˜ข๐˜ณ๐˜ด ๐˜ฐ๐˜ง ๐˜ฆ๐˜ท๐˜ฐ๐˜ญ๐˜ถ๐˜ต๐˜ช๐˜ฐ๐˜ฏ ๐˜ช๐˜ด ๐˜ฏ๐˜ฐ๐˜ธ ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ฎ๐˜ฐ๐˜ด๐˜ต ๐˜ฑ๐˜ฐ๐˜ข๐˜ค๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ๐˜ฅ ๐˜ฎ๐˜ข๐˜ฎ๐˜ฎ๐˜ข๐˜ญ ๐˜ฐ๐˜ฏ ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ฑ๐˜ญ๐˜ข๐˜ฏ๐˜ฆ๐˜ตโ€ฆ

These scaly anteaters are listed as Vulnerable on the IUCNโ€™s Red List โ€“ largely because they are being poached relentlessly (along with the other three African pangolin species) for illegal trade. Their scales are used as traditional medicine in both Africa and Asia. This trade appears to focus largely on the selling of live pangolins.
IUCN Red List of Threatened Species
Throughout Africa, pangolins are largely targeted as bushmeat, with scales used in traditional medicine. The species is considered powerful and held in high regard, but just a small quantity of each scale is used.

โš ๏ธUnfortunately, Asian demand for scales means they are now a commodity and poaching has increased hugely. Asian trade has boomed because the Asian pangolins have all but been wiped out โ€“ two species are listed as Critically Endangered.

The African Pangolin Working Group (APWG) was established on 27 June 2011, following an inaugural meeting by a diverse group of people who all have one passion in common โ€“ understanding and protecting pangolins in Africa.

The APWGโ€™s objectives are encompassed by its mission statement: โ€œThe African Pangolin Working Group will strive towards the conservation and protection of all four African pangolin species by generating knowledge, developing partnerships and creating public awareness and education initiatives.โ€

๐†๐ž๐ญ ๐ข๐ง๐ฏ๐จ๐ฅ๐ฏ๐ž๐!
The APWG is mapping the past and present distribution of all pangolin occurring on the African continent. APWG requests members of the public to please submit all their pangolin sightings (past, present and future) to this survey.

They welcome sightings of any pangolin species from any year and any country. All sighting locations are treated with the strictest confidence.

To participate, visit:
africanpangolin.org/conserve/report-a-pangolin-sighting/

For more information on the APWG, visit: www.africanpangolin.org

Follow APWG on Facebook! www.facebook.com/pages/African-Pangolin-Working-Group/513407302073363

Photos as published in ๐™‹๐™–๐™ฃ๐™œ๐™ค๐™ก๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™จ: ๐™Ž๐™˜๐™–๐™ก๐™š๐™จ ๐™ค๐™› ๐™„๐™ฃ๐™Ÿ๐™ช๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™˜๐™š by Richard Peirce (2020). Available online! www.penguinrandomhouse.co.za/book/pangolins-scales-injustice/9781775847137
Struik Nature Club

For more information about Dabchick Wildlife Reserve, visit www.dabchick.co.za
AMES Foundation
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #Africa
... See MoreSee Less

โš ๏ธ๐™’๐™Š๐™๐™‡๐˜ฟโ€™๐™Ž ๐™ˆ๐™Š๐™Ž๐™ ๐™๐™๐˜ผ๐™๐™๐™„๐˜พ๐™†๐™€๐˜ฟ ๐˜ผ๐™‰๐™„๐™ˆ๐˜ผ๐™‡
๐‰๐จ๐ข๐ง ๐ฎ๐ฌ ๐ข๐ง ๐จ๐›๐ฌ๐ž๐ซ๐ฏ๐ข๐ง๐  ๐–๐จ๐ซ๐ฅ๐ ๐๐š๐ง๐ ๐จ๐ฅ๐ข๐ง ๐ƒ๐š๐ฒ ๐Ÿ๐ŸŽ๐Ÿ๐Ÿ’

๐Ÿ’ก๐˜—๐˜ข๐˜ฏ๐˜จ๐˜ฐ๐˜ญ๐˜ช๐˜ฏ โ€“ ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ท๐˜ฆ๐˜ฏ๐˜ฆ๐˜ณ๐˜ข๐˜ฃ๐˜ญ๐˜ฆ โ€˜๐˜ธ๐˜ช๐˜ด๐˜ฆ ๐˜ฐ๐˜ญ๐˜ฅ ๐˜ฎ๐˜ข๐˜ฏโ€™ ๐˜ฐ๐˜ง ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ˆ๐˜ง๐˜ณ๐˜ช๐˜ค๐˜ข๐˜ฏ ๐˜ฃ๐˜ถ๐˜ด๐˜ฉ โ€“ ๐˜ช๐˜ด ๐˜ด๐˜ข๐˜ช๐˜ฅ ๐˜ต๐˜ฐ ๐˜ฃ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ข ๐˜ต๐˜ฐ๐˜ต๐˜ฆ๐˜ฎ ๐˜ฐ๐˜ง ๐˜จ๐˜ฐ๐˜ฐ๐˜ฅ ๐˜ญ๐˜ถ๐˜ค๐˜ฌ ๐˜ข๐˜ฏ๐˜ฅ ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ฃ๐˜ณ๐˜ช๐˜ฏ๐˜จ๐˜ฆ๐˜ณ ๐˜ฐ๐˜ง ๐˜ณ๐˜ข๐˜ช๐˜ฏ. ๐˜›๐˜ฉ๐˜ช๐˜ด ๐˜ฆ๐˜ฏ๐˜ช๐˜จ๐˜ฎ๐˜ข๐˜ต๐˜ช๐˜ค ๐˜ค๐˜ณ๐˜ฆ๐˜ข๐˜ต๐˜ถ๐˜ณ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ข๐˜ต ๐˜ฉ๐˜ฐ๐˜ญ๐˜ฅ๐˜ด ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ด๐˜ฆ๐˜ค๐˜ณ๐˜ฆ๐˜ต๐˜ด ๐˜ฐ๐˜ง 85 ๐˜ฎ๐˜ช๐˜ญ๐˜ญ๐˜ช๐˜ฐ๐˜ฏ ๐˜บ๐˜ฆ๐˜ข๐˜ณ๐˜ด ๐˜ฐ๐˜ง ๐˜ฆ๐˜ท๐˜ฐ๐˜ญ๐˜ถ๐˜ต๐˜ช๐˜ฐ๐˜ฏ ๐˜ช๐˜ด ๐˜ฏ๐˜ฐ๐˜ธ ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ฎ๐˜ฐ๐˜ด๐˜ต ๐˜ฑ๐˜ฐ๐˜ข๐˜ค๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ๐˜ฅ ๐˜ฎ๐˜ข๐˜ฎ๐˜ฎ๐˜ข๐˜ญ ๐˜ฐ๐˜ฏ ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ฑ๐˜ญ๐˜ข๐˜ฏ๐˜ฆ๐˜ตโ€ฆ

These scaly anteaters are listed as Vulnerable on the IUCNโ€™s Red List โ€“ largely because they are being poached relentlessly (along with the other three African pangolin species) for illegal trade. Their scales are used as traditional medicine in both Africa and Asia. This trade appears to focus largely on the selling of live pangolins. 
IUCN Red List of Threatened Species
Throughout Africa, pangolins are largely targeted as bushmeat, with scales used in traditional medicine. The species is considered powerful and held in high regard, but just a small quantity of each scale is used. 

โš ๏ธUnfortunately, Asian demand for scales means they are now a commodity and poaching has increased hugely. Asian trade has boomed because the Asian pangolins have all but been wiped out โ€“ two species are listed as Critically Endangered.

The African Pangolin Working Group (APWG) was established on 27 June 2011, following an inaugural meeting by a diverse group of people who all have one passion in common โ€“ understanding and protecting pangolins in Africa.

The APWGโ€™s objectives are encompassed by its mission statement: โ€œThe African Pangolin Working Group will strive towards the conservation and protection of all four African pangolin species by generating knowledge, developing partnerships and creating public awareness and education initiatives.โ€

๐†๐ž๐ญ ๐ข๐ง๐ฏ๐จ๐ฅ๐ฏ๐ž๐!
The APWG is mapping the past and present distribution of all pangolin occurring on the African continent. APWG requests members of the public to please submit all their pangolin sightings (past, present and future) to this survey.

They welcome sightings of any pangolin species from any year and any country. All sighting locations are treated with the strictest confidence. 

To participate, visit: 
https://africanpangolin.org/conserve/report-a-pangolin-sighting/

For more information on the APWG, visit: www.africanpangolin.org

Follow APWG on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/pages/African-Pangolin-Working-Group/513407302073363

Photos as published in ๐™‹๐™–๐™ฃ๐™œ๐™ค๐™ก๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™จ: ๐™Ž๐™˜๐™–๐™ก๐™š๐™จ ๐™ค๐™› ๐™„๐™ฃ๐™Ÿ๐™ช๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™˜๐™š by Richard Peirce (2020). Available online! https://www.penguinrandomhouse.co.za/book/pangolins-scales-injustice/9781775847137
Struik Nature Club

For more information about Dabchick Wildlife Reserve, visit www.dabchick.co.za
AMES Foundation
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #AfricaImage attachmentImage attachment+3Image attachment

2 CommentComment on Facebook

Rewilding Africa REWILDING Southern Africa

๐˜ฟ๐˜ผ๐˜ฝ๐˜พ๐™ƒ๐™„๐˜พ๐™† ๐™’๐™„๐™‡๐˜ฟ ๐˜ฝ๐™„๐™๐˜ฟ๐™Ž
๐ƒ๐–๐‘ ๐๐ข๐ซ๐ ๐จ๐Ÿ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐ฆ๐จ๐ง๐ญ๐ก!
๐…๐ž๐›๐ซ๐ฎ๐š๐ซ๐ฒ ๐Ÿ๐ŸŽ๐Ÿ๐Ÿ’
๐•๐ข๐ฅ๐ฅ๐š๐ ๐ž ๐ฐ๐ž๐š๐ฏ๐ž๐ซ (๐™‹๐™ก๐™ค๐™˜๐™š๐™ช๐™จ ๐™˜๐™ช๐™˜๐™ช๐™ก๐™ก๐™–๐™ฉ๐™ช๐™จ).
๐ˆ๐”๐‚๐ ๐‚๐จ๐ง๐ฌ๐ž๐ซ๐ฏ๐š๐ญ๐ข๐จ๐ง ๐’๐ญ๐š๐ญ๐ฎ๐ฌ: Least Concern

Typically one of the most common weaver species where it occurs, but care should be taken to separate it from rarer species, especially when in nonbreeding plumage.

โ€œThe village and lesser masked weavers are most similar in their lifestyles. Both are colonial nesters and will often breed in large colonies with both species present.

๐Ÿ’กThis almost begs the question as to how it is that two such similar species can co-exist as closely as they do.

Colonies are almost invariably located over water, usually suspended from overhanging branches of trees or sometimes in reedbeds where nests are attached to vertical reed stems, they breed in summer after good rains have fallen.

The villagesโ€™ nests are neatly woven with little or no entrance spout while those of the lesser maskeds are rather untidy with loose grass stems sticking out and a short, narrow entrance spout.

To attract a female, males display by calling and hanging upside down on the nest fluttering his wings. Calls are rather harsh phrases of โ€˜swizzlingโ€™ and โ€˜churringโ€™ notes. A female will inspect a nest and if she does not โ€˜acceptโ€™ the structure, the male will destroy it and start again.

๐Ÿ’กContrary to popular belief, it is not the female that destroys the nest if she does not like it! A female will apparently accept a nest if she decides it is structurally sound, but once she has accepted the nest, she will line it with soft grass inflorescences and leaves. The lesser masked male will usually then also lengthen the spout.

Such large breeding colonies are often targeted by predators that try to gain access to the eggs or nestlings. These include snakes (particularly the boomslang and black mamba), but also avian predators, such as harrier-hawks, fish eagles and crows. Vervet monkeys are also known to exploit such colonies. Members of the colony will communally try to defend it by aggressively โ€˜mobbingโ€™ intruders.

The diet of each of these species is described as having a large insect component, but also the nectar of aloes and Schotia species, flower parts and seeds. Village weaversโ€™ insectivorous preferences are reportedly for small beetles, while lesser maskeds favour caterpillars.

๐Ÿ’กSo, it is perhaps the difference in diet that allows these two species to successfully co-exist.โ€
- Extract from Species ID Birds by Dr Ian Whyte as published in KRUGER MAGAZINE AUTUMN 2024.

โ€ผ๏ธSee photographs and video recordings of both species in โ€˜commentsโ€™, below.

๐Ÿ’กโ€There is a lot still to learn about the amazing nest weaving abilities of this group of birds. It is also a testament to the amazing benefits of mutations, selection pressures and evolution. We must realize that the environment is dynamic and we must learn not to put our static vision of nature in our conservation thinking" - Dr Peter Oberem

๐ŸŽฌ ๐–๐š๐ญ๐œ๐ก ๐ญ๐ก๐ข๐ฌ!
Visit youtu.be/62G9kw9Ziek?si=NHbPPA0JU6OaQOLh to watch the video: โ€œHow weaver birds evolved to build huge nestsโ€.

๐ŸŽผ ๐’๐จ๐ฎ๐ง๐๐ฌ, ๐’๐จ๐ง๐ ๐ฌ & ๐’๐ง๐š๐ฉ๐ฌ๐ก๐จ๐ญ๐ฌ!
ebird.org/species/vilwea1?siteLanguage=en_GB

๐Ÿ“ธ Keith Collins

@followers
๐Ÿฆ…Dabchick Wildlife Reserve always offers great bird and other photography opportunities! Book your stay now!
#Birdwatching #Ecotourism
For reservations, contact Anele by email: hospitality@dabchick.co.za
AMES Foundation Rewilding Africa
For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #Africa
... See MoreSee Less

๐˜ฟ๐˜ผ๐˜ฝ๐˜พ๐™ƒ๐™„๐˜พ๐™† ๐™’๐™„๐™‡๐˜ฟ ๐˜ฝ๐™„๐™๐˜ฟ๐™Ž
๐ƒ๐–๐‘ ๐๐ข๐ซ๐ ๐จ๐Ÿ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐ฆ๐จ๐ง๐ญ๐ก! 
๐…๐ž๐›๐ซ๐ฎ๐š๐ซ๐ฒ ๐Ÿ๐ŸŽ๐Ÿ๐Ÿ’
๐•๐ข๐ฅ๐ฅ๐š๐ ๐ž ๐ฐ๐ž๐š๐ฏ๐ž๐ซ (๐™‹๐™ก๐™ค๐™˜๐™š๐™ช๐™จ ๐™˜๐™ช๐™˜๐™ช๐™ก๐™ก๐™–๐™ฉ๐™ช๐™จ).
๐ˆ๐”๐‚๐ ๐‚๐จ๐ง๐ฌ๐ž๐ซ๐ฏ๐š๐ญ๐ข๐จ๐ง ๐’๐ญ๐š๐ญ๐ฎ๐ฌ: Least Concern

Typically one of the most common weaver species where it occurs, but care should be taken to separate it from rarer species, especially when in nonbreeding plumage.

โ€œThe village and lesser masked weavers are most similar in their lifestyles. Both are colonial nesters and will often breed in large colonies with both species present. 

๐Ÿ’กThis almost begs the question as to how it is that two such similar species can co-exist as closely as they do.

Colonies are almost invariably located over water, usually suspended from overhanging branches of trees or sometimes in reedbeds where nests are attached to vertical reed stems, they breed in summer after good rains have fallen.

The villagesโ€™ nests are neatly woven with little or no entrance spout while those of the lesser maskeds are rather untidy with loose grass stems sticking out and a short, narrow entrance spout.

To attract a female, males display by calling and hanging upside down on the nest fluttering his wings. Calls are rather harsh phrases of โ€˜swizzlingโ€™ and โ€˜churringโ€™ notes. A female will inspect a nest and if she does not โ€˜acceptโ€™ the structure, the male will destroy it and start again. 

๐Ÿ’กContrary to popular belief, it is not the female that destroys the nest if she does not like it! A female will apparently accept a nest if she decides it is structurally sound, but once she has accepted the nest, she will line it with soft grass inflorescences and leaves. The lesser masked male will usually then also lengthen the spout. 

Such large breeding colonies are often targeted by predators that try to gain access to the eggs or nestlings. These include snakes (particularly the boomslang and black mamba), but also avian predators, such as harrier-hawks, fish eagles and crows. Vervet monkeys are also known to exploit such colonies. Members of the colony will communally try to defend it by aggressively โ€˜mobbingโ€™ intruders.

The diet of each of these species is described as having a large insect component, but also the nectar of aloes and Schotia species, flower parts and seeds. Village weaversโ€™ insectivorous preferences are reportedly for small beetles, while lesser maskeds favour caterpillars. 

๐Ÿ’กSo, it is perhaps the difference in diet that allows these two species to successfully co-exist.โ€
- Extract from Species ID Birds by Dr Ian Whyte as published in KRUGER  MAGAZINE AUTUMN 2024.

โ€ผ๏ธSee photographs and video recordings of both species in โ€˜commentsโ€™, below.

๐Ÿ’กโ€There is a lot still to learn about the amazing nest weaving abilities of this group of birds. It is also a testament to the amazing benefits of mutations, selection pressures and evolution. We must realize that the environment is dynamic and we must learn not to put our static vision of nature in our conservation thinking - Dr Peter Oberem

๐ŸŽฌ ๐–๐š๐ญ๐œ๐ก ๐ญ๐ก๐ข๐ฌ!
Visit https://youtu.be/62G9kw9Ziek?si=NHbPPA0JU6OaQOLh to watch the video: โ€œHow weaver birds evolved to build huge nestsโ€.

๐ŸŽผ ๐’๐จ๐ฎ๐ง๐๐ฌ, ๐’๐จ๐ง๐ ๐ฌ & ๐’๐ง๐š๐ฉ๐ฌ๐ก๐จ๐ญ๐ฌ!
https://ebird.org/species/vilwea1?siteLanguage=en_GB

๐Ÿ“ธ Keith Collins

@followers
๐Ÿฆ…Dabchick Wildlife Reserve always offers great bird and other photography opportunities! Book your stay now! 
#Birdwatching #Ecotourism
For reservations, contact Anele by email: hospitality@dabchick.co.za
AMES Foundation Rewilding Africa
For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #Africa

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๐•๐ข๐ฅ๐ฅ๐š๐ ๐ž ๐ฐ๐ž๐š๐ฏ๐ž๐ซ (๐™‹๐™ก๐™ค๐™˜๐™š๐™ช๐™จ ๐™˜๐™ช๐™˜๐™ช๐™ก๐™ก๐™–๐™ฉ๐™ช๐™จ) Visit youtu.be/9Pbmqg2ifxs?si=G6KczjaPndEWXn0m for sound recordings of the village weaver. Published by Stories Of The Kruger.

๐‹๐ž๐ฌ๐ฌ๐ž๐ซ ๐ฆ๐š๐ฌ๐ค๐ž๐ ๐ฐ๐ž๐š๐ฏ๐ž๐ซ (๐™‹๐™ก๐™ค๐™˜๐™š๐™ช๐™จ ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™ฉ๐™š๐™ง๐™ข๐™š๐™™๐™ž๐™ช๐™จ) Visit youtu.be/crhVqCs6fcE?si=avmcLniNAKkR7zkK for sound recordings of the lesser masked weaver. Published by Stories Of The Kruger.

Nice

๐™‡๐™š๐™ฉโ€™๐™จ ๐™ค๐™—๐™จ๐™š๐™ง๐™ซ๐™š 2024 ๐™„๐™ฃ๐™ฉ๐™š๐™ง๐™ฃ๐™–๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™–๐™ก ๐™•๐™š๐™—๐™ง๐™– ๐˜ฟ๐™–๐™ฎ!
Dabchick Wildlife Reserve
A common question is, โ€œ๐™’๐™๐™ฎ ๐™™๐™ค ๐™ฏ๐™š๐™—๐™ง๐™–๐™จ ๐™๐™–๐™ซ๐™š ๐™—๐™ก๐™–๐™˜๐™  ๐™–๐™ฃ๐™™ ๐™ฌ๐™๐™ž๐™ฉ๐™š ๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™ง๐™ž๐™ฅ๐™š๐™จ?โ€

๐Ÿ’กโ€There is no certainty about this, but such a skin pattern must have evolved for a reason. Like fingerprints in humans, stripe patterns are unique to each zebra and must be of assistance in recognising each other. This uniqueness is a feature that is often used by researchers studying zebras where individual recognition is important, and the inverted triangular pattern on the shoulder is a useful focal area for facilitating recognition.โ€ (Read more! ๐˜ฟ๐˜ผ๐™•๐™•๐™‡๐™„๐™‰๐™‚ ๐™•๐™€๐˜ฝ๐™๐˜ผ๐™Ž by Dr Ian Whyte, as published in Kruger Magazine, Issue 8, Winter 2019.

๐Ÿ’กโ€Striping as seen in zebra is known to be caused by the migration, in the developing embryo, of the melanoblasts or precursor cells of melanocytes. At a certain stage of embryonic development, the melanoblasts migrate from the neural crest of the embryo in the vertical patterns which are responsible for the black stripes. It is speculated that the white striping is due either to the melanoblasts dying off in the areas which give rise to the white stripes and the white belly, or the genes in the cells in white areas being switched off.โ€ (Dr Pamela Oberem)

๐Ÿ’กโ€Even more interesting is the explanation proposed by zoologist Jonathan Bard for the variation in the number of stripes seen in various zebra species (Burchellโ€™s have 26, Cape mountain 43 and Grรฉvyโ€™s 80). Bard proposed that the stripe development happens at different intervals in embryonic development, those with more stripes developing them when the embryo is larger, thus providing greater surface area for stripes to form. These differences in timing are probably due to gene regulatory changes, possibly with an adaptive function.โ€ (Dr Pamela Oberem)

๐‘๐ž๐š๐ ๐š๐ฅ๐ฅ ๐š๐›๐จ๐ฎ๐ญ ๐ข๐ญ!
๐™๐™ƒ๐™€ ๐™€๐™‘๐™Š ๐˜ฟ๐™€๐™‘๐™Š ๐™Š๐™ ๐˜พ๐™Š๐™‡๐™Š๐™๐™, ๐™Ž๐™‹๐™Š๐™๐™Ž ๐˜ผ๐™‰๐˜ฟ ๐™Ž๐™๐™๐™„๐™‹๐™€๐™Ž by Dr Pamela Oberem
REWILDING Southern Africa Rewilding Africa
โ€˜๐๐ฅ๐ข๐ ๐ก๐ญ ๐จ๐Ÿ ๐๐ซ๐ž๐๐š๐ญ๐จ๐ซ๐ฌโ€™ | ๐€๐ฏ๐š๐ข๐ฅ๐š๐›๐ฅ๐ž ๐ง๐จ๐ฐ!

๐Ÿ“ท Photo ยฉ Clint Ralph Photography

For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #Africa
... See MoreSee Less

๐™‡๐™š๐™ฉโ€™๐™จ ๐™ค๐™—๐™จ๐™š๐™ง๐™ซ๐™š 2024 ๐™„๐™ฃ๐™ฉ๐™š๐™ง๐™ฃ๐™–๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™–๐™ก ๐™•๐™š๐™—๐™ง๐™– ๐˜ฟ๐™–๐™ฎ!
Dabchick Wildlife Reserve
A common question is, โ€œ๐™’๐™๐™ฎ ๐™™๐™ค ๐™ฏ๐™š๐™—๐™ง๐™–๐™จ ๐™๐™–๐™ซ๐™š ๐™—๐™ก๐™–๐™˜๐™  ๐™–๐™ฃ๐™™ ๐™ฌ๐™๐™ž๐™ฉ๐™š ๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™ง๐™ž๐™ฅ๐™š๐™จ?โ€ 

๐Ÿ’กโ€There is no certainty about this, but such a skin pattern must have evolved for a reason. Like fingerprints in humans, stripe patterns are unique to each zebra and must be of assistance in recognising each other. This uniqueness is a feature that is often used by researchers studying zebras where individual recognition is important, and the inverted triangular pattern on the shoulder is a useful focal area for facilitating recognition.โ€ (Read more! ๐˜ฟ๐˜ผ๐™•๐™•๐™‡๐™„๐™‰๐™‚ ๐™•๐™€๐˜ฝ๐™๐˜ผ๐™Ž by Dr Ian Whyte, as published in Kruger Magazine, Issue 8, Winter 2019.

๐Ÿ’กโ€Striping as seen in zebra is known to be caused by the migration, in the developing embryo, of the melanoblasts or precursor cells of melanocytes. At a certain stage of embryonic development, the melanoblasts migrate from the neural crest of the embryo in the vertical patterns which are responsible for the black stripes. It is speculated that the white striping is due either to the melanoblasts dying off in the areas which give rise to the white stripes and the white belly, or the genes in the cells in white areas being switched off.โ€ (Dr Pamela Oberem)

๐Ÿ’กโ€Even more interesting is the explanation proposed by zoologist Jonathan Bard for the variation in the number of stripes seen in various zebra species (Burchellโ€™s have 26, Cape mountain 43 and Grรฉvyโ€™s 80). Bard proposed that the stripe development happens at different intervals in embryonic development, those with more stripes developing them when the embryo is larger, thus providing greater surface area for stripes to form. These differences in timing are probably due to gene regulatory changes, possibly with an adaptive function.โ€ (Dr Pamela Oberem)

๐‘๐ž๐š๐ ๐š๐ฅ๐ฅ ๐š๐›๐จ๐ฎ๐ญ ๐ข๐ญ!
๐™๐™ƒ๐™€ ๐™€๐™‘๐™Š ๐˜ฟ๐™€๐™‘๐™Š ๐™Š๐™ ๐˜พ๐™Š๐™‡๐™Š๐™๐™, ๐™Ž๐™‹๐™Š๐™๐™Ž ๐˜ผ๐™‰๐˜ฟ ๐™Ž๐™๐™๐™„๐™‹๐™€๐™Ž by Dr Pamela Oberem
REWILDING Southern Africa Rewilding Africa
โ€˜๐๐ฅ๐ข๐ ๐ก๐ญ ๐จ๐Ÿ ๐๐ซ๐ž๐๐š๐ญ๐จ๐ซ๐ฌโ€™ | ๐€๐ฏ๐š๐ข๐ฅ๐š๐›๐ฅ๐ž ๐ง๐จ๐ฐ!

๐Ÿ“ท Photo ยฉ Clint Ralph Photography

For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #Africa

1 CommentComment on Facebook

Pragtige foto.Dankie.

๐‹๐ž๐ญโ€™๐ฌ ๐จ๐›๐ฌ๐ž๐ซ๐ฏ๐ž ๐–๐จ๐ซ๐ฅ๐ ๐„๐ง๐ฏ๐ข๐ซ๐จ๐ง๐ฆ๐ž๐ง๐ญ๐š๐ฅ ๐„๐๐ฎ๐œ๐š๐ญ๐ข๐จ๐ง ๐ƒ๐š๐ฒ!
Dabchick Wildlife Reserve
Waterberg Biosphere Reserve
๐˜ฟ๐™’๐™ ๐˜ฝ๐™๐™Ž๐™ƒ ๐˜พ๐˜ผ๐™ˆ๐™‹ ๐˜พ๐™Š๐™๐™๐™Ž๐™€๐™Ž ๐˜ผ๐™‰๐˜ฟ ๐˜ผ๐˜พ๐™๐™„๐™‘๐™„๐™๐™„๐™€๐™Ž!
An experienced bushmaster and associate of DWR, Les Brett runs a series of courses in our tented bush camp, which is situated under a giant fig tree. The camp is simple, with a great bush atmosphere (firelight and lamplight), but has basic comforts like hot showers and flush toilets. It can accommodate groups of up to 20 guests.

๐Ÿ’กThe courses available range from anti-poaching, tracking, survival, bush cooking, education, safaris and much more. The bush camp experience is popular with international students and tourist groups.

To learn more about the bush camp experience, visit Les Brettโ€™s Dung Beetle Bush School! www.dung-beetle.co.za/Home/

For reservations, contact Anele by email: hospitality@dabchick.co.za

For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #Africa
... See MoreSee Less

๐‹๐ž๐ญโ€™๐ฌ ๐จ๐›๐ฌ๐ž๐ซ๐ฏ๐ž ๐–๐จ๐ซ๐ฅ๐ ๐„๐ง๐ฏ๐ข๐ซ๐จ๐ง๐ฆ๐ž๐ง๐ญ๐š๐ฅ ๐„๐๐ฎ๐œ๐š๐ญ๐ข๐จ๐ง ๐ƒ๐š๐ฒ!
Dabchick Wildlife Reserve 
Waterberg Biosphere Reserve
๐˜ฟ๐™’๐™ ๐˜ฝ๐™๐™Ž๐™ƒ ๐˜พ๐˜ผ๐™ˆ๐™‹ ๐˜พ๐™Š๐™๐™๐™Ž๐™€๐™Ž ๐˜ผ๐™‰๐˜ฟ ๐˜ผ๐˜พ๐™๐™„๐™‘๐™„๐™๐™„๐™€๐™Ž!
An experienced bushmaster and associate of DWR, Les Brett runs a series of courses in our tented bush camp, which is situated under a giant fig tree. The camp is simple, with a great bush atmosphere (firelight and lamplight), but has basic comforts like hot showers and flush toilets. It can accommodate groups of up to 20 guests.

๐Ÿ’กThe courses available range from anti-poaching, tracking, survival, bush cooking, education, safaris and much more. The bush camp experience is popular with international students and tourist groups.

To learn more about the bush camp experience, visit Les Brettโ€™s Dung Beetle Bush School! http://www.dung-beetle.co.za/Home/

For reservations, contact Anele by email: hospitality@dabchick.co.za

For more information, visit www.dabchick.co.za
#ConserveWildlife #ProtectBiodiversity #AfricaImage attachment

1 CommentComment on Facebook

๐–๐š๐ญ๐œ๐ก ๐ญ๐ก๐ข๐ฌ! @followers ๐ŸŽž๏ธ youtu.be/N37myUTO8EQ?si=s19TU7BhqVma2n8Q

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